Gluten-Free Berry Crisp

http://blog.kingarthurflour.com/2015/07/04/gluten-free-berry-crisp/

http://blog.kingarthurflour.com/?p=123859

Sweet, bubbling berries under a crisp topping? Sounds like the making of a perfect berry crisp to me!

And while berry crisps are traditionally served during the summer, when berries are at their peak of freshness, I love knowing that you can enjoy this simple dessert year round. My trick? Pick extra berries during the summer and freeze them so you can enjoy this wonderfully light dessert in the middle of winter. I promise, it will do wonders for your winter blues.

Today, rather than just sharing my favorite berry crisp recipe, I’m actually going to show you how to make a gluten-free berry crisp four different ways. All simple, all easy – and all delicious.

How to make the ultimate Gluten-Free Berry Crisp via @kingarthurflour

First, we’ll start with the filling. I like to use a mix of berries, but you can use whatever you have on hand – fresh or frozen. Combine the following:

4 cups (1 quart) berries, fresh or frozen
2 tablespoons King Arthur Gluten-Free Flour
1/4 cup sugar

Mix these ingredients together in a bowl and transfer them to an 8″ or 9″ cast iron skillet (or 8” square baking dish or 9″ pie pan) and prepare your toppings. When topped, bake the crisp in a preheated 375°F oven for 25 to 45 minutes, until the berries are bubbling and the topping has started to brown (bake the shorter amount of time for fresh berries, longer for frozen).

And now for the fun part. Here are the four different gluten-free toppings:

Gluten-Free Berry Crumble via @kingarthurflour

1. Classic Gluten-Free Berry Crisp

To start, we’re going in the crumble direction. Just a simple blend of King Arthur Gluten-Free Flour, butter, and sugar, it’s almost like a fluffy biscuit on top of the berries.

Gluten-Free Berry Crumble via @kingarthurflourHere’s what you’ll need:

1 1/2 cups King Arthur Gluten-Free Flour
6 tablespoons cold butter, cut into chunks
3 tablespoons sugar

Mix these ingredients together with your hands or a pastry cutter until the butter is incorporated but there are still large pieces remaining. Sprinkle over the berries and bake.

Gluten-Free Triple Berry Crisp via @kingarthurflour

2. Gluten-Free Oatmeal Crisp

My second option uses a blend of oats, brown sugar, butter, and spices. I love how crisp it gets, and the spices pair perfectly with the berries.

Gluten-Free Triple Berry Crisp via @kingarthurflourHere’s what you’ll need:

2 cup gluten-free rolled oats (make sure to use certified gluten-free certified if you have a severe allergy)
1/3 cup brown sugar
2 tablespoons King Arthur Gluten-Free Flour
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 cup cold butter, cut into chunks

Mix together the dry ingredients. Add the butter, working it into the mixture until incorporated. Sprinkle over the berries and bake.

Gluten-Free Granola Crisp via @kingarthurflour

3. Gluten-Free Granola Crisp

I love this option for when you’re short on time and don’t want to worry about mixing together a bunch of ingredients. Just use your favorite flavor of granola, mix it with a little butter and flour, and you have the perfect crisp topping.

Gluten-Free Granola Crisp via @kingarthurflourHere’s what you’ll need:

2 cups granola (any variety)
2 tablespoons King Arthur Gluten-Free Flour
1/4 cup cold butter, cut into chunks

Mix together the granola and flour, then work in the butter until it’s incorporated and the mixture becomes a little clumpy. Sprinkle over the berries, and bake.


grain-free-berry-crisp-10

4. Grain-Free Berry Crisp

Last but not least, this completely grain-free option is simply delicious. Using almonds, some coconut oil, and maple syrup, it’s healthy, easy, and tastes so good that I actually enjoy eating it for breakfast!

Grain-Free Berry Crisp via @kingarthurflourHere are the ingredients:

2 cups almond flour
1/2 cup chopped almonds (or nuts of your choice)
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon vanilla powder (optional)
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 tablespoons melted coconut oil
2 to 3 tablespoons maple syrup

Whisk together the flour, almonds, and spices. Stir in the coconut oil, then add the maple syrup one tablespoon at a time, until the mixture begins to come together and form clumps. Squeeze the mixture together with your fingers a little as your spread it over the berries – so you have a few larger pieces – and bake.

And now it’s time to dig in! Enjoy these berry crisps, and make sure to leave us a comment letting us know which ones you’ve tried!

Grain-Free Berry Crisp via @kingarthurflour

Please bake, rate, and review our Gluten-Free Berry Crisp recipe.

Print just the recipe.

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<p class="ljsyndicationlink"><a href="http://blog.kingarthurflour.com/2015/07/04/gluten-free-berry-crisp/">http://blog.kingarthurflour.com/2015/07/04/gluten-free-berry-crisp/</a></p><p class="ljsyndicationlink"><a href="http://blog.kingarthurflour.com/?p=123859">http://blog.kingarthurflour.com/?p=123859</a></p><p class="p1">Sweet, bubbling berries under a crisp topping? Sounds like the making of a perfect berry crisp to me!</p> <p class="p1">And while berry crisps are traditionally served during the summer, when berries are at their peak of freshness, I love knowing that you can enjoy this simple dessert year round. My trick? Pick extra berries during the summer and freeze them so you can enjoy this wonderfully light dessert in the middle of winter. I promise, it will do wonders for your winter blues.</p> <p class="p1">Today, rather than just sharing my favorite berry crisp recipe, I’m actually going to show you how to make a gluten-free berry crisp four different ways. All simple, all easy – and all delicious.</p> <p class="p1"><a href="http://blog.kingarthurflour.com/files/2015/06/gluten-free-berry-crisp-filling.png"><img class="aligncenter size-full wp-image-123861" src="http://blog.kingarthurflour.com/files/2015/06/gluten-free-berry-crisp-filling.png" alt="How to make the ultimate Gluten-Free Berry Crisp via @kingarthurflour" /></a></p> <p class="p1">First, we’ll start with the filling. I like to use a mix of berries, but you can use whatever you have on hand – fresh or frozen. Combine the following:</p> <p class="p1">4 cups (1 quart) berries, fresh or frozen<br /> 2 tablespoons <a href="http://www.kingarthurflour.com/shop/items/gluten-free-flour-24-oz" target="_blank">King Arthur Gluten-Free Flour</a><br /> 1/4 cup sugar</p> <p class="p1">Mix these ingredients together in a bowl and transfer them to an 8&#8243; or 9&#8243; cast iron skillet (or <a href="http://www.kingarthurflour.com/shop/items/square-pan-8" target="_blank">8” square baking dish</a> or 9&#8243; <a href="http://www.kingarthurflour.com/shop/items/white-stoneware-pie-plate-9" target="_blank">pie pan</a>) and prepare your toppings. When topped, bake the crisp in a preheated 375°F oven for 25 to 45 minutes, until the berries are bubbling and the topping has started to brown (bake the shorter amount of time for fresh berries, longer for frozen).</p> <p class="p1">And now for the fun part. Here are the four different gluten-free toppings:</p> <p class="p1"><a href="http://blog.kingarthurflour.com/files/2015/06/gluten-free-berry-crisp-7.jpg"><img class="aligncenter size-full wp-image-123869" src="http://blog.kingarthurflour.com/files/2015/06/gluten-free-berry-crisp-7.jpg" alt="Gluten-Free Berry Crumble via @kingarthurflour" /></a></p> <h2 class="p1">1. Classic Gluten-Free Berry Crisp</h2> <p class="p1">To start, we’re going in the crumble direction. Just a simple blend of <a href="http://www.kingarthurflour.com/shop/items/gluten-free-flour-24-oz" target="_blank">King Arthur Gluten-Free Flour</a>, butter, and sugar, it’s almost like a fluffy biscuit on top of the berries.</p> <p class="p1"><a href="http://blog.kingarthurflour.com/files/2015/06/gluten-free-berry-crisp-4.jpg"><img class="aligncenter size-full wp-image-123865" src="http://blog.kingarthurflour.com/files/2015/06/gluten-free-berry-crisp-4.jpg" alt="Gluten-Free Berry Crumble via @kingarthurflour" /></a>Here&#8217;s what you&#8217;ll need:</p> <p class="p1">1 1/2 cups <a href="http://www.kingarthurflour.com/shop/items/gluten-free-flour-24-oz" target="_blank">King Arthur Gluten-Free Flour</a><br /> 6 tablespoons cold butter, cut into chunks<br /> 3 tablespoons sugar</p> <p class="p1">Mix these ingredients together with your hands or a pastry cutter until the butter is incorporated but there are still large pieces remaining. Sprinkle over the berries and bake.</p> <p class="p1"><a href="http://blog.kingarthurflour.com/files/2015/06/gluten-free-berry-crisp-8.jpg"><img class="aligncenter size-full wp-image-123881" src="http://blog.kingarthurflour.com/files/2015/06/gluten-free-berry-crisp-8.jpg" alt="Gluten-Free Triple Berry Crisp via @kingarthurflour" /></a></p> <h2 class="p1">2. Gluten-Free Oatmeal Crisp</h2> <p class="p1">My second option uses a blend of oats, brown sugar, butter, and spices. I love how crisp it gets, and the spices pair perfectly with the berries.</p> <p class="p1"><a href="http://blog.kingarthurflour.com/files/2015/06/gluten-free-berry-crisp-2.jpg"><img class="aligncenter size-full wp-image-123875" src="http://blog.kingarthurflour.com/files/2015/06/gluten-free-berry-crisp-2.jpg" alt="Gluten-Free Triple Berry Crisp via @kingarthurflour" /></a>Here&#8217;s what you’ll need:</p> <p class="p1">2 cup gluten-free rolled oats (make sure to use certified gluten-free certified if you have a severe allergy)<br /> 1/3 cup brown sugar<br /> 2 tablespoons <a href="http://www.kingarthurflour.com/shop/items/gluten-free-flour-24-oz" target="_blank">King Arthur Gluten-Free Flour</a><br /> 1 teaspoon <a href="http://www.kingarthurflour.com/shop/items/vietnamese-cinnamon-3-oz" target="_blank">cinnamon</a><br /> 1/2 teaspoon salt<br /> 1/4 cup cold butter, cut into chunks</p> <p class="p1">Mix together the dry ingredients. Add the butter, working it into the mixture until incorporated. Sprinkle over the berries and bake.</p> <p class="p1"><a href="http://blog.kingarthurflour.com/files/2015/06/gluten-free-berry-crisp.jpg"><img class="aligncenter size-full wp-image-123871" src="http://blog.kingarthurflour.com/files/2015/06/gluten-free-berry-crisp.jpg" alt="Gluten-Free Granola Crisp via @kingarthurflour" /></a></p> <h2 class="p1">3. Gluten-Free Granola Crisp</h2> <p class="p1">I love this option for when you’re short on time and don’t want to worry about mixing together a bunch of ingredients. Just use your favorite flavor of granola, mix it with a little butter and flour, and you have the perfect crisp topping.</p> <p class="p1"><a href="http://blog.kingarthurflour.com/files/2015/06/gluten-free-berry-crisp-9.jpg"><img class="aligncenter size-full wp-image-123883" src="http://blog.kingarthurflour.com/files/2015/06/gluten-free-berry-crisp-9.jpg" alt="Gluten-Free Granola Crisp via @kingarthurflour" /></a>Here’s what you’ll need:</p> <p class="p1">2 cups granola (any variety)<br /> 2 tablespoons <a href="http://www.kingarthurflour.com/shop/items/gluten-free-flour-24-oz" target="_blank">King Arthur Gluten-Free Flour</a><br /> 1/4 cup cold butter, cut into chunks</p> <p class="p1">Mix together the granola and flour, then work in the butter until it’s incorporated and the mixture becomes a little clumpy. Sprinkle over the berries, and bake.</p> <p class="p1"><a href="http://blog.kingarthurflour.com/files/2015/06/gluten-free-berry-crisp-6.jpg"><br /> </a> <a href="http://blog.kingarthurflour.com/files/2015/06/grain-free-berry-crisp-10.jpg"><img class="aligncenter size-full wp-image-123885" src="http://blog.kingarthurflour.com/files/2015/06/grain-free-berry-crisp-10.jpg" alt="grain-free-berry-crisp-10" /></a></p> <h2 class="p1">4. Grain-Free Berry Crisp</h2> <p class="p1">Last but not least, this completely grain-free option is simply delicious. Using almonds, some coconut oil, and maple syrup, it’s healthy, easy, and tastes so good that I actually enjoy eating it for breakfast!</p> <p class="p1"><a href="http://blog.kingarthurflour.com/files/2015/06/grain-free-berry-crisp-ingredients.jpg"><img class="aligncenter size-full wp-image-123887" src="http://blog.kingarthurflour.com/files/2015/06/grain-free-berry-crisp-ingredients.jpg" alt="Grain-Free Berry Crisp via @kingarthurflour" /></a>Here are the ingredients:</p> <p class="p1">2 cups <a href="http://www.kingarthurflour.com/shop/items/almond-flour-1-lb" target="_blank">almond flour</a><br /> 1/2 cup chopped almonds (or nuts of your choice)<br /> 1 teaspoon <a href="http://www.kingarthurflour.com/shop/items/vietnamese-cinnamon-3-oz" target="_blank">cinnamon</a><br /> 1/2 teaspoon <a href="http://www.kingarthurflour.com/shop/items/vanilla-powder-25-oz" target="_blank">vanilla powder</a> (optional)<br /> 1/2 teaspoon salt<br /> 2 tablespoons melted coconut oil<br /> 2 to 3 tablespoons maple syrup</p> <p class="p1">Whisk together the flour, almonds, and spices. Stir in the coconut oil, then add the maple syrup one tablespoon at a time, until the mixture begins to come together and form clumps. Squeeze the mixture together with your fingers a little as your spread it over the berries – so you have a few larger pieces – and bake.</p> <p class="p1">And now it&#8217;s time to dig in! Enjoy these berry crisps, and make sure to leave us a comment letting us know which ones you&#8217;ve tried!</p> <p class="p1"><a href="http://blog.kingarthurflour.com/files/2015/06/gluten-free-berry-crisp-1.jpg"><img class="aligncenter size-full wp-image-123867" src="http://blog.kingarthurflour.com/files/2015/06/gluten-free-berry-crisp-1.jpg" alt="Grain-Free Berry Crisp via @kingarthurflour" /></a></p> <p class="p1">Please bake, rate, and review our <a href="http://www.kingarthurflour.com/recipes/gluten-free-berry-crisp-recipe">Gluten-Free Berry Crisp</a> recipe.</p> <p class="p1"><a href="http://www.kingarthurflour.com/recipes/PrintRecipe?RID=5961&amp;radio=1">Print</a> just the recipe.</p> <div class="crp_related"><h5>Related Posts</h5><ul><li><a href="http://www.kingarthurflour.com/blog/2012/04/23/gluten-free-lemon-berry-shortcakes-peeking-in-on-summer/" class="crp_title”>Gluten-Free Lemon Berry Shortcake</a></li><li><a href="http://www.kingarthurflour.com/blog/2013/04/14/gluten-free-blueberry-coffeecake-another-mix-magic-miracle/" class="crp_title”>Gluten-Free Blueberry Coffee Cake</a></li><li><a href="http://www.kingarthurflour.com/blog/2014/07/04/gluten-free-strawberry-vanilla-whoopie-pies/" class="crp_title”>Gluten-Free Strawberry Whoopie Pies</a></li><li><a href="http://www.kingarthurflour.com/blog/2015/05/22/strawberry-almond-flour-cake/" class="crp_title”>Strawberry Almond Flour Cake</a></li> </ul><div style="clear:both"></div></div><p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://blog.kingarthurflour.com/2015/07/04/gluten-free-berry-crisp/">Gluten-Free Berry Crisp</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://blog.kingarthurflour.com">Flourish - King Arthur Flour</a>.</p>

American Flag Pie

http://blog.kingarthurflour.com/2015/07/01/american-flag-pie/

http://blog.kingarthurflour.com/?p=123679

Truthfully? When I saw this American flag pie sitting in the test kitchen, awaiting its critique, I thought, “I wouldn’t make that in a million years.”

Not because it didn’t look delicious; it absolutely did.

But would you look at all that work? Not just making a pie crust, which is time-consuming enough. But cutting the stripes to the exact right length! Cutting out stars! Making two different fillings, and then positioning them in the crust EXACTLY right, in order to get the flag effect.

Yeah – when you-know-what freezes over. As I’ve said more than once, when they were passing out “fancy” genes, I wasn’t standing in the Martha Stewart line.

But then… well, that pie just looked too darned good to pass up. Strawberry and blueberry – all in one? And heck, it’s not as if the stripes have to be woven into any fancy lattice-type crust. I should be able to do this – right?

If I can do this, so can you. And, truth be told – yeah, it took awhile, but it was actually fun.

Though don’t tell anyone I said that – I’ll lose my charter membership in Baking Cranks Anonymous.

Are you ready? Follow me on the path to fancy.

1. Prepare your favorite double pie crust recipe.

I’m devoted to our Classic Double Pie Crust, whose combination of two fats – butter and shortening – offers the best of all worlds: flavor from the butter, structure from the shortening, and flakiness from both. For more on this, see our post Butter vs. Shortening: the Great Pie Crust Bakeoff.

How to make Flag Pie via @kingarthurflour

2. Divide the pie dough into two pieces: one-third of the total, and two-thirds.

That’s right, one piece should be twice as large as the other. If you have a scale, this is an easy task. If you don’t, just eyeball it.

Why not just divide the dough in half?

Well, think about it. The bottom crust has to line the entire pie pan, and then some; the top is just for decoration. So use the larger piece for the bottom crust.

How to make Flag Pie via @kingarthurflour

3. Roll the larger piece of pie dough into a 13″ round.

You’re going to use it to line a 9″ pie pan that’s at least 1 1/2″ deep, plus make a tall crimp. This pie has a LOT of filling, so yes, you do need a pan with these dimensions.

If your pan is shallow or small, just assume you’ll take any excess filling and bake it up separately. Throw a bit of streusel on top, and you’ve got berry crisp.

How to make Flag Pie via @kingarthurflour

4. Make a pretty (and tall) crimp.

I mean, why not? If you’re going the fancy route, you might as well go all the way.

And with all the filling you’ll be piling into the crust, be sure to make that crimp just as tall and sturdy as you can.

How to make Flag Pie via @kingarthurflour

5. Cut out the stars and stripes.

Roll the smaller piece of pie dough into a 10″ x 6″ rectangle about 3/8″ thick. Cut the dough, lengthwise, into six 3/4″-wide, 10″-long strips; you’ll have some dough left over. 

Here’s a neat trick: to trim the 10″ strips exactly the right length, get yourself a 9″ parchment round (pre-cut, or DIY). Mark off one-quarter of the round; this is the blueberry/stars area.

Fit six stripes onto the parchment, trimming them even with its curved edge; again, you’ll have dough left over.

Use star cookie cutters to cut 1 1/4″ stars (or the size stars of your choice) from the remaining dough. Arrange them on the parchment. 

Place the stars and stripes, still on their round, on a parchment-lined baking sheet. A giant spatula works very well here.

How to make Flag Pie via @kingarthurflour

Place any remaining stars and stripes on the same sheet.

For extra sparkle and crunch, spray everything with water and sprinkle with coarse white sparkling sugar. Any extra stars and stripes will become yummy pie-scrap snacks.

Why not use an egg wash (egg and water, or egg white and water) – won’t that help the sugar adhere better? Yes, but it’ll also promote browning; and you want these stars and stripes to remain as light-colored as possible.

How to make Flag Pie via @kingarthurflour

6. Prepare the berries.

To make the strawberry filling: Whisk together 1/2 cup Pie Filling Enhancer, 2 teaspoons lemon juice, and 1/8 teaspoon salt. Toss with 5 to 6 cups hulled, chopped strawberries.

Note: the original recipe calls for strawberry-rhubarb filling; follow it if you wish. I just figure not all of you out there have easy access to rhubarb.

To make the blueberry filling: Whisk together 2 tablespoons sugar and 2 tablespoons Pie Filling Enhancer. Toss 2 cups blueberries with the sugar mixture, then stir in 1 1/2 teaspoons lemon juice.

Both of the berry mixtures will be quite dry; don’t worry about it, they’ll exude plenty of juice as they bake.

And what if you don’t have Pie Filling Enhancer? For the strawberry filling, substitute 5 tablespoons King Arthur Unbleached All-Purpose Flour; and add 1/3 cup sugar. For the blueberry filling, substitute 2 tablespoons King Arthur Unbleached All-Purpose Flour; and increase the sugar by 4 teaspoons.

Want to know more about the various ways to thicken fruit pie fillings? Read our post, Thickening Fruit Pies, for lots of good information.

How to make Flag Pie via @kingarthurflour

7. Spoon the berries into the crust.

First, block off a 90° wedge of the crust using a piece of folded aluminum foil. I used an adjustable pie dam; worked like a charm. I regret we no longer sell this handy tool, but I’ll bet you can find it elsewhere.

Pile the blueberries into the 90° wedge; the strawberries into the remainder of the crust. You’ll need to really heap the berries quite high; that’s OK, they’ll settle as they bake.

Once you’ve added the berries, remove the foil (or dam).

OK, now don’t panic – I’m about to diverge from our American Flag Pie recipe. Charlotte, the test kitchen baker who developed this lovely pie, likes to add her stars and stripes to the top of the pie before baking. I like to bake the stars and stripes separately, and apply them to the fully baked pie as soon as I take it out of the oven.

What’s the difference? Pastry baked atop the pie runs the risk of becoming “stained” with bubbling berry juices.

Heaven forbid! Maybe I picked up a few of those Martha genes after all.

Preheat the oven to 425°F.

How to make Flag Pie via @kingarthurflour

8. Bake the pie on your oven’s lower rack.

Why the lower rack? Baking pie in the bottom part of your oven helps insure its bottom crust will be nice and brown, rather than white and soggy.

Bake the stars and stripes on a rack above the pie. I don’t show them here, as I wanted to get a picture of the pie on the bottom. But as soon as I took the shot, I slid those stars and stripes right onto the rack above the pie.

Bake the stars for about 12 to 14 minutes; the stripes for 20 to 22 minutes, until set and barely browned. You want them to be fully baked, but still be fairly light-colored.

Bake the pie for 30 minutes. Reduce the oven heat to 375°F and bake for an additional 35 to 45 minutes, until the filling is bubbling and the crust nicely browned.

How to make Flag Pie via @kingarthurflour

Do as I say, not as I did! I got busy doing other chores and left my stars and stripes in the oven too long. Hooray for the red, brown, and blue…

How to make Flag Pie via @kingarthurflour

9. Remove the pie from the oven.

Note the overflow; this is exactly why I continually beat the drum for parchment. EASY cleanup.

Flag Pie via @kingarthurflour

10. Immediately apply the stars and stripes.

Do this carefully; the filling will be very hot. The hot filling acts as “glue,” holding the decorations in place as it cools.

Speaking of cooling: as with any fruit pie, you want this to cool completely before you cut into it – unless you’re OK with a soupy red-and-blue mess.

If you want warm pie, your best bet is to reheat individual slices just before serving. If you’re very careful, you can do this in the microwave. Otherwise, your oven, set at 350°F will do a good job.

That wasn’t so hard, was it? Trying something challenging can be fun – especially when the result is just so darned cute.

Happy 4th!

Please read, bake, and review our recipe for American Flag Pie.

Print just the recipe.

Wait a minute – before you go, I’ve got one more tip to pass along.

Take any leftover strips of pie dough, sprinkle generously with cinnamon-sugar, bake, and enjoy…

How to make American Flag Pie via @kingarthurflour

…a fast-food lookalike – pie fries!

The post American Flag Pie appeared first on Flourish - King Arthur Flour.

Gluten-Free Cookout Recipes

http://blog.kingarthurflour.com/2015/06/30/gluten-free-cookout-recipes/

http://blog.kingarthurflour.com/?p=123645

When prepping for a gluten-free summer cookout, my mind immediately jumps to the traditional staples: burgers, dogs, pasta salad, potato salad, and some kind of green salad.

Oh, and for dessert, you’d better believe there’ll be cookies, brownies, and likely some sort of cake. Really, it’s just the classic BBQ menu with a simple, gluten-free twist.

For most of the time I’ve been gluten-free, I’ll go to a barbecue and be able to eat a bun-less hamburger and some green salad (probably undressed because so many dressings contain gluten). It’s a pretty lackluster experience, if you ask me.

So when I’m hosting a cookout, I make a point to make sure that my gluten-free guests don’t feel deprived. And today I’m going to share some of our best gluten-free cookout recipes, ones that would be a great addition to your cookout menu!

Gluten-Free Hamburger Buns via @kingarthurflour

1. Gluten-Free Hamburger Buns

These are a stand-by recipe for gluten-free dinner rolls that I just tweaked and turned into hamburger buns (the recipe tells you how). I used English muffin rings to make them nice and round, and sprinkled some sesame seeds on top for that “classic” burger bun feel. These are super easy to make and can be made ahead of time and frozen if need be.

 Oven-Baked Gluten-Free Chicken Wings via @kingarthurflour

2. Oven-Baked Chicken

For those who don’t feel like a burger or a hot dog, I like to offer something else. Grilled chicken is a simple option, but this baked chicken is a healthier version of a favorite. Who doesn’t like healthy “fried” chicken!? It uses our gluten-free baking mix as the coating, and is ultra-crisp and juicy. Guests love this!

 Creamy Baked Artichoke + Zucchini Dip via @kingarthurflour

3. Creamy Artichoke Zucchini Dip

While everyone’s standing around as dinner gets grilled, it’s nice to have some appetizers to munch on. I like to serve this dip because it’s a really easy recipe and goes well with tortilla chips or crackers (make sure they’re gluten-free!) I also like this appetizer because it can be prepped ahead of time and then simply baked 30 minutes before people show up. Note: you can easily prepare this dip in your Zojirushi bread machine, using the homemade menu; see details in the recipe.

  

Bacon Horseradish Spread via @kingarthurflour

4. Bacon Horseradish Spread

For those of us who like a little twist on their burger, this horseradish spread is spectacular. It’s quick and easy to put together, and pairs well with burgers; sausage, too. Plus, you can also use it as a quick dip for chips or vegetables – just make a little extra!

 

Baked Zucchini Sticks via @kingarthurflour

5. Baked Zucchini Sticks

These are a fun appetizer that use fresh summer produce. They’re quick and easy and make for a healthy alternative to french fries. They’re also delicious when dipped in the horseradish dip – or in the sweet onion dip detailed in the recipe. Please note, this recipe uses panko breadcrumbs, so read the recipe notes to see the gluten-free substitution!

 

Gluten-Free Cheese Crackers via @kingarthurflour

6. Gluten-Free Cheese Crackers

If you’ve never made homemade crackers before, now’s your chance. These are delicious, and surprisingly simple to make. They’re like a gourmet version of Cheez-Its!

 

Strawberry Almond Flour Cake via @kingarthurflour

7. Strawberry Almond Flour Cake

Ever since i first tried this recipe, it’s become a go-to for me. It’s so easy to make; is allergy-friendly, and tastes absolutely amazing. I like to top it with whatever berries are in season, but feel free to use whatever fruit you have on hand. One reader even used sliced almonds, which sounds delicious!

 

 Fudgy Gluten-Free Brownies via @kingarturflour

8. Gluten-Free Brownies

What would a cookout be without brownies? I’m a big fan of homemade brownies, and these are the best gluten-free version I’ve tried. They’re so much tastier than a mix, and are a cinch to put together. But most importantly, they’re fudgy, chocolate-y, and will satisfy anyone’s chocolate craving – you might want to make two pans so you have extra!

 

Gluten-Free Flourless Peanut Butter Cookies via @kingarthurflour

9. Flourless Peanut Butter Chocolate Chip Cookies

My final must-have on the summer cookout menu is chocolate chip cookies. Cookies are a perfect addition because they’re easy and portable. So if you’re outside, or have kids running around, having a plate of cookies means people can just pick one up with a napkin and enjoy. No forks required!

 Enjoy the party!

The perfect gluten-free summer cookout menu via @kingarthurflour

One thing to note as you’re planning your cookout: make sure you read the labels of the food you’re buying! Many hot dogs, sausages, veggie burgers, marinades, sauces, and dressings contain “hidden” gluten.

Now we’d love to hear from you – if you’re planning an upcoming summer cookout, what do you usually add to your menu? Leave us a comment below!

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<p class="ljsyndicationlink"><a href="http://blog.kingarthurflour.com/2015/06/30/gluten-free-cookout-recipes/">http://blog.kingarthurflour.com/2015/06/30/gluten-free-cookout-recipes/</a></p><p class="ljsyndicationlink"><a href="http://blog.kingarthurflour.com/?p=123645">http://blog.kingarthurflour.com/?p=123645</a></p><p>When prepping for a gluten-free summer cookout, my mind immediately jumps to the traditional staples: burgers, dogs, pasta salad, potato salad, and some kind of green salad.</p> <p>Oh, and for dessert, you&#8217;d better believe there&#8217;ll be cookies, brownies, and likely some sort of cake. Really, it’s just the classic BBQ menu with a simple, gluten-free twist.</p> <p>For most of the time I’ve been gluten-free, I’ll go to a barbecue and be able to eat a bun-less hamburger and some green salad (probably undressed because so many dressings contain gluten). It’s a pretty lackluster experience, if you ask me.</p> <p>So when I’m hosting a cookout, I make a point to make sure that my gluten-free guests don’t feel deprived. And today I’m going to share some of our best gluten-free cookout recipes, ones that would be a great addition to your cookout menu!</p> <p><strong><a href="http://blog.kingarthurflour.com/files/2015/06/gluten-free-hamburger-buns.jpg"><img class="aligncenter size-full wp-image-123649" src="http://blog.kingarthurflour.com/files/2015/06/gluten-free-hamburger-buns.jpg" alt="Gluten-Free Hamburger Buns via @kingarthurflour" /></a></strong></p> <h2>1. <a href="http://www.kingarthurflour.com/recipes/gluten-free-high-fiber-dinner-rolls-recipe">Gluten-Free Hamburger Buns</a></h2> <p>These are a stand-by recipe for gluten-free dinner rolls that I just tweaked and turned into hamburger buns (the recipe tells you how). I used <a href="http://www.kingarthurflour.com/shop/items/english-muffin-rings-set-of-12" target="_blank">English muffin rings</a> to make them nice and round, and sprinkled some sesame seeds on top for that “classic” burger bun feel. These are super easy to make and can be made ahead of time and frozen if need be.</p> <p><strong> <a href="http://blog.kingarthurflour.com/files/2015/06/baked-chicken-wings.png"><img class="aligncenter size-full wp-image-123839" src="http://blog.kingarthurflour.com/files/2015/06/baked-chicken-wings.png" alt="Oven-Baked Gluten-Free Chicken Wings via @kingarthurflour" /></a></strong></p> <h2>2. <a href="http://www.kingarthurflour.com/recipes/oven-baked-chicken-made-with-baking-mix-recipe" target="_blank">Oven-Baked Chicken</a></h2> <p>For those who don’t feel like a burger or a hot dog, I like to offer something else. Grilled chicken is a simple option, but this baked chicken is a healthier version of a favorite. Who doesn’t like healthy “fried” chicken!? It uses our <a href="http://www.kingarthurflour.com/shop/items/gluten-free-baking-mix" target="_blank">gluten-free baking mix</a> as the coating, and is ultra-crisp and juicy. Guests love this!</p> <p><strong> <img class="aligncenter size-full wp-image-123843" src="http://blog.kingarthurflour.com/files/2015/06/creamy-artichoke-zucchini-dip.png" alt="Creamy Baked Artichoke + Zucchini Dip via @kingarthurflour" /></strong></p> <h2>3. <a href="http://www.kingarthurflour.com/recipes/creamy-artichoke-zucchini-dip-recipe" target="_blank">Creamy Artichoke Zucchini Dip</a></h2> <p>While everyone&#8217;s standing around as dinner gets grilled, it’s nice to have some appetizers to munch on. I like to serve this dip because it’s a really easy recipe and goes well with tortilla chips or crackers (make sure they&#8217;re gluten-free!) I also like this appetizer because it can be prepped ahead of time and then simply baked 30 minutes before people show up. Note: you can easily prepare this dip in your <a href="http://www.kingarthurflour.com/shop/items/zojirushi-bb-cec20-home-bakery-supreme-bread-machine-stainless-steel">Zojirushi bread machine</a>, using the homemade menu; see details in the recipe.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong> </strong></p> <p><strong><a href="http://blog.kingarthurflour.com/files/2015/06/BaconHorseSprd.jpg"><img class="aligncenter size-full wp-image-123835" src="http://blog.kingarthurflour.com/files/2015/06/BaconHorseSprd.jpg" alt="Bacon Horseradish Spread via @kingarthurflour" /></a></strong></p> <h2>4. <a href="http://www.kingarthurflour.com/recipes/bacon-horseradish-spread-recipe" target="_blank">Bacon Horseradish Spread</a></h2> <p>For those of us who like a little twist on their burger, this horseradish spread is spectacular. It’s quick and easy to put together, and pairs well with burgers; sausage, too. Plus, you can also use it as a quick dip for chips or vegetables – just make a little extra!</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><a href="http://blog.kingarthurflour.com/files/2015/06/baked-zucchini-sticks.png"><img class="aligncenter size-full wp-image-123845" src="http://blog.kingarthurflour.com/files/2015/06/baked-zucchini-sticks.png" alt="Baked Zucchini Sticks via @kingarthurflour" /></a></p> <h2>5. <a href="http://www.kingarthurflour.com/recipes/baked-zucchini-sticks-and-sweet-onion-dip-recipe" target="_blank">Baked Zucchini Sticks</a></h2> <p>These are a fun appetizer that use fresh summer produce. They&#8217;re quick and easy and make for a healthy alternative to french fries. They&#8217;re also delicious when dipped in the horseradish dip – or in the sweet onion dip detailed in the recipe. Please note, this recipe uses panko breadcrumbs, so read the recipe notes to see the gluten-free substitution!</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><a href="http://blog.kingarthurflour.com/files/2015/06/gluten-free-cheese-crackers.png"><img class="aligncenter size-full wp-image-123841" src="http://blog.kingarthurflour.com/files/2015/06/gluten-free-cheese-crackers.png" alt="Gluten-Free Cheese Crackers via @kingarthurflour" /></a></p> <h2>6. <a href="http://www.kingarthurflour.com/recipes/gluten-free-cheese-crackers-recipe" target="_blank">Gluten-Free Cheese Crackers</a></h2> <p>If you&#8217;ve never made homemade crackers before, now&#8217;s your chance. These are delicious, and surprisingly simple to make. They&#8217;re like a gourmet version of Cheez-Its!</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong><a href="http://blog.kingarthurflour.com/files/2015/05/strawberry-almond-flour-cake.jpg"><img class="aligncenter size-full wp-image-121957" src="http://blog.kingarthurflour.com/files/2015/05/strawberry-almond-flour-cake.jpg" alt="Strawberry Almond Flour Cake via @kingarthurflour" /></a></strong></p> <h2>7. <a href="http://www.kingarthurflour.com/recipes/strawberry-almond-flour-cake-recipe" target="_blank">Strawberry Almond Flour Cake</a></h2> <p>Ever since i first tried this recipe, it&#8217;s become a go-to for me. It’s so easy to make; is allergy-friendly, and tastes absolutely amazing. I like to top it with whatever berries are in season, but feel free to use whatever fruit you have on hand. One reader even used sliced almonds, which sounds delicious!</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong> <a href="http://blog.kingarthurflour.com/files/2015/06/GF-Brownie-1-min.jpg"><img class="aligncenter size-full wp-image-123837" src="http://blog.kingarthurflour.com/files/2015/06/GF-Brownie-1-min.jpg" alt="Fudgy Gluten-Free Brownies via @kingarturflour" /></a></strong></p> <h2>8. <a href="http://www.kingarthurflour.com/recipes/gluten-free-brownies-recipe" target="_blank">Gluten-Free Brownies</a></h2> <p>What would a cookout be without brownies? I’m a big fan of homemade brownies, and these are the best gluten-free version I’ve tried. They’re so much tastier than a mix, and are a cinch to put together. But most importantly, they’re fudgy, chocolate-y, and will satisfy anyone’s chocolate craving – you might want to make two pans so you have extra!</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong><a href="http://blog.kingarthurflour.com/files/2015/06/GF-Peanut-Butter-Cookies_02-1.jpg"><img class="aligncenter wp-image-123833 size-full" src="http://blog.kingarthurflour.com/files/2015/06/GF-Peanut-Butter-Cookies_02-1.jpg" alt="Gluten-Free Flourless Peanut Butter Cookies via @kingarthurflour" /></a></strong></p> <h2>9. <a href="http://www.kingarthurflour.com/recipes/flourless-peanut-butter-chocolate-chip-cookies-recipe" target="_blank">Flourless Peanut Butter Chocolate Chip Cookies</a></h2> <p>My final must-have on the summer cookout menu is chocolate chip cookies. Cookies are a perfect addition because they’re easy and portable. So if you’re outside, or have kids running around, having a plate of cookies means people can just pick one up with a napkin and enjoy. No forks required!</p> <p><strong> Enjoy the party!</strong></p> <p><img class="aligncenter size-full wp-image-123647" src="http://blog.kingarthurflour.com/files/2015/06/gluten-free-hamburger-buns-5.jpg" alt="The perfect gluten-free summer cookout menu via @kingarthurflour" /></p> <p><em>One thing to note as you’re planning your cookout: make sure you read the labels of the food you’re buying! Many hot dogs, sausages, veggie burgers, marinades, sauces, and dressings contain &#8220;hidden&#8221; gluten.<br /> </em></p> <p>Now we’d love to hear from you – if you’re planning an upcoming summer cookout, what do you usually add to your menu?<strong> Leave us a comment below!</strong></p> <div class="crp_related"><h5>Related Posts</h5><ul><li><a href="http://www.kingarthurflour.com/blog/2013/05/24/potato-salad-coleslaw-fast-easy-and-homemade/" class="crp_title”>Potato salad + Coleslaw</a></li><li><a href="http://www.kingarthurflour.com/blog/2015/05/22/strawberry-almond-flour-cake/" class="crp_title”>Strawberry Almond Flour Cake</a></li></ul><div style="clear:both"></div></div><p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://blog.kingarthurflour.com/2015/06/30/gluten-free-cookout-recipes/">Gluten-Free Cookout Recipes</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://blog.kingarthurflour.com">Flourish - King Arthur Flour</a>.</p>

National Festival of Breads

http://blog.kingarthurflour.com/2015/06/29/national-festival-breads/

http://blog.kingarthurflour.com/?p=123901

Since its inception in 2009, and every two years thereafter, King Arthur Flour has been a proud sponsor of the National Festival of Breads – America’s premier amateur bread-baking contest.

Producing the best flour has always been at the core of King Arthur’s mission, but so has encouraging and inspiring bakers to expand their baking know-how, including learning where their flour comes from.

This year hundreds of people submitted recipes to the contest. Eventually eight finalists from across the country were selected to navigate their way to Manhattan, Kansas to see how King Arthur flour is produced, and to bake their bread recipes – live, in front of an audience and judges.

National Festival of Breads via @kingarthurflour

As we all become more conscientious about where our food comes from, it’s a full-circle moment when you’re able to experience the entire supply chain – from walking through wheat fields, talking directly with a farmer, visiting a grain mill, and finally handling a bag of flour immediately after it’s been packaged. A tour of Farmer Direct Foods, which mills much of King Arthur Flour’s whole wheat flour, was part of the program for the eight finalists.

“I’ve been an avid bread baker for over 40 years, but I’ll never look at wheat in the same way again. Along with days and days of fun and excitement, this experience has truly been an education for me,” finalist Patrice Hurd, of Bemidji, Minnesota, acknowledged.

Here at King Arthur, we know that to make outstanding bread you have to start with the best wheat and continue with the best milling practices. “As a consumer of your products it was such an affirmation to learn more about the people who care so much about the quality and consistency of the ingredients that go into my recipes. I have gained a whole new appreciation for what it takes to make great bread,” noted Lisa Keys of Kennett Square, Pennsylvania – whose recipe was eventually crowned the festival’s grand champion.

National Festival of Breads via @kingarthurflour

Every one of the nearly 1,000 attendees at the National Festival of Breads received their own free 2-pound bag of King Arthur White Whole Wheat Flour, which contains wheat grown and milled in Kansas.

Keys’ winning recipe, Smokehouse Cranberry Cheese Bread, interestingly enough has a Vermont connection. “Memories of visits with my in-laws in Quechee, Vermont inspired this bread. My mother-in-law always had smoked cheeses from the local farmers and fresh maple syrup tapped from trees in town… This bread honors all of her goodness,” she said.

National Festival of Breads via @kingarthurflour

Lisa Keys, winner of the National Festival of Breads, holds up her trophy and winning loaf of bread.

As the winner, Keys will make her way back to Vermont to take her class of choice at our Baking Education Center in Norwich, only 10 minutes away from Quechee.

“For my recipe to be named the grand champion was a totally unexpected thrill of a lifetime. Never in a million years did I think it was going to be me,” exclaimed Keys. “I cannot wait to come to Vermont and become an even better baker and further spread the word of the goodness of King Arthur Flour.”

See the eight finalist recipes from the 2015 National Festival of Breads.

The post National Festival of Breads appeared first on Flourish - King Arthur Flour.

Brioche Buns

http://blog.kingarthurflour.com/2015/06/28/brioche-buns/

http://blog.kingarthurflour.com/?p=123347

If the word brioche conjures up a mental image of an oversized, buxom loaf with a rather complicated topknot – think again. Brioche buns are the simple way to enjoy this French classic.

Here’s the first thing you need to know about brioche dough: it’s rich. Packed with eggs and butter, it bakes up into a light, mahogany-brown loaf perfect for sandwiches. And if you’re making breakfast toast, don’t bother with the butter dish; a simple slather of jam is sufficient.

Brioche buns – brioche dough, shaped into burger buns – bring their signature richness to the backyard barbecue. Tender (but not crumbly), light (but still substantial), they’re absolutely perfect for a big burger and all the fixings.

But don’t stop there. A juicy grilled chicken breast with sliced avocado and homemade salsa might destroy a typical store-bought bun, reducing it to soggy crumbs. But brioche buns are undeterred by excess moisture; bring on the relish!

Have you ever made a classic brioche? Then you’ll enjoy this new twist on an old favorite.

Never made brioche? Follow these simple steps for a tasty take on burger buns.

Brioche dough doesn’t come together quite like standard yeast dough. So pay close attention to our tips along the way.

IMG_1192

1. Don’t skimp on the rich ingredients.

Low-fat brioche is an oxymoron. The texture and flavor of these buns rely on butter and eggs, so bite the bullet and use the full amount of both – including the extra egg yolk. You won’t be wasting the white; you’ll use it later on.

Start by putting the following ingredients into a bowl; preferably the bowl of a stand mixer, though alternatively you can use an electric hand mixer. Your bread machine, set on the dough cycle, is also a good choice.

2 3/4 cups (11 1/2 ounces) King Arthur Unbleached All-Purpose Flour
1/4 cup Baker’s Special Dry Milk or nonfat dry milk
2 tablespoons sugar
1 1/4 teaspoons salt
1 tablespoon instant yeast
3 large eggs + 1 large egg yolk, white reserved for topping
3 to 4 tablespoons lukewarm water*
10 tablespoons unsalted butter

*Start with 3 tablespoons in summer, or under humid conditions; 4 tablespoons in winter, or when it’s dry out.

Brioche Buns-15

2. Use a mixer or bread machine to make the dough.

Can you mix and “knead” brioche dough by hand? I’d recommend this ONLY if you’re a seasoned and very fit bread baker. Fully developing this rich dough by hand would probably take up to 25 to 30 minutes of vigorous mixing with a spoon; it’s so soft that only at the very end might you be able to actually knead it.

Don’t bother getting out your mixer’s dough hook; you’ll be sticking with the beater blade here – “sticking” being the key word. This dough is STICKY when it starts out, before eventually becoming smooth, soft, and satiny.

Start by mixing all of the ingredients together at medium speed. They’ll cling to the sides of the bowl; scrape them into the center, and mix some more. I use speed 4 on my KitchenAid.

Continue mixing the dough at medium speed. After about 10 minutes or so, you should see it starting to form a ball (lower left photo). Scrape the dough into the center of the bowl again, and continue to mix, scraping the bowl to help it along, until the dough is smooth and soft, perhaps sticking a bit but no longer coating the sides of the bowl.

Attention, bread machine aficionados: set your machine on the dough cycle, and walk away. The bread machine is PERFECT for making brioche dough. When the dough cycle is complete, refrigerate it overnight (instructions below).

Brioche Buns-16

3. Let the dough rise for 1 hour, then refrigerate it overnight.

Brioche dough is easier to handle when it’s cold. So let it rise at room temperature until it’s noticeably puffy (top photos); then place it in a bag (no need to grease the bag), fasten the bag at the top, and refrigerate the dough overnight.

Why do I have two batches of dough going here, you ask? I was testing two yeasts: SAF Red and SAF Gold. SAF Gold helps dough with a higher percentage of sugar rise better; would it also help dough with a higher percentage of fat?

The answer is no; it works the same as SAF Red in high-fat doughs. Though SAF Red (on the left in the two photos) actually appears to work better than Gold, that’s simply because it had a half-hour head start; I mixed the Red dough first, followed by the Gold.

How to make brioche buns via @kingarthurflour

Top, mega-buns. Bottom, a combination of standard and slider buns.

4. Decide how many brioche buns you want to make.

This recipe will make six mega-buns, perfect for your half-pound burgers; eight standard burger buns; or 16 mini-buns, just right for sliders.

Divide the dough into the desired number of pieces. If you have a scale, weigh the dough before you start; this will make division totally simple.

Shape each piece of dough into a flattened round: about 3 1/4″ diameter for large buns, 3″ for standard, and 2 1/2″ for mini.

Place the larger buns in a hamburger bun pan, if desired, for extra support. Standard and mini buns will be fine on a half-sheet pan, spaced about 2″ apart. I like to line the pan with parchment, for easiest cleanup.

How to make brioche buns via @kingarthurflour

5. For smoothest shape, flatten shaped brioche buns with a tool – not simply your hands.

Since the dough is both chilled and high in fat, you’ll find it easy to work with; it feels a bit like soft, smooth clay, rather than a typical springy yeast dough.

You can get pretty smooth brioche buns simply by using the palm of your hand to flatten them. But here’s a helpful tip: once you’ve shaped the dough into a ball, flatten it with something completely flat: like a bowl scraper, or the bottom of a measuring cup (if you have one large enough). Press down firmly, then make a couple of small circles with your hand (think washing a window), to “round” the bun under pressure.

So, how come those buns in the previous photos don’t look perfectly smooth and round? I didn’t discover this technique until I was nearly done shaping them, and was discouraged with the results. Necessity is the mother of invention!

How to make brioche buns via @kingarthurflour

6. Let the brioche buns rise fully.

Because the dough is cold, the brioche buns may take longer to rise. Let them. Don’t set your stopwatch and rail against fate if they’re not nice and puffy when the alarm goes off.

If the dough is particularly cold and your house is, as well, the buns may take up to 3 hours to rise fully. On the hot summer day when I made these, they only took about 90 minutes.

And what does “rise fully” mean? Well, if you’re making them in a hamburger bun pan, they should definitely crest above the rim of the pan.

For buns on a baking sheet, they should start to “lift” off the sheet: see how their sides are bulging out just a bit, starting to become the big, rounded buns they’ll bake into? That’s what you’re after.

Towards the end of the rising time, preheat your oven to 375°F, with a rack in the center.

How to make brioche buns via @kingarthurflour

7. For added flavor and crunch, top with seeds.

Remember that egg white you saved, back when you were making the dough? Whisk it with 1 tablespoon cold water, and brush the resulting “egg wash” on the buns.

Then top with seeds: sesame, for a typical fast food-type sesame seed bun; or my favorite, everything bagel topping, a tasty mixture of poppy and sesame seeds, dried onion, garlic, and salt.

How to make brioche buns via @kingarthurflour

Even if you’re not adding seeds, it pays to brush the brioche buns with egg wash. On the left, an “unwashed” bun; on the right, a washed bun. Egg white adds both color and shine.

How to make brioche buns via @kingarthurflour

Some seeded, some plain – looks like these plump brioche buns are ready.

Bake the large buns for 18 to 19 minutes. Slider buns will take about 14 minutes, and standard buns something in between. The buns should be golden brown, and a digital thermometer inserted into their center should read 190°F.

Note to those who want to mix bun sizes on the same pan, as I did. Remember, the smaller ones will bake more quickly than the larger ones. When the small ones are done, grab ’em off the baking sheet with a pair of tongs (or your baker-tough, heatproof fingers – OUCH); and transfer them to a rack to cool, leaving the larger buns in the oven to continue baking.

Now there’s one caveat to all this, and it leads to our final tip –

Brioche buns via @kingarthurflour

8. It’s easy to over-bake the buns. Don’t do it.

Brioche buns will brown quickly, due to their high fat content, as well as the egg wash. And you want to err on the side of moistness. So keep your eye on the buns as they bake, and your digital thermometer handy.

No thermometer? It pays to break one open when you think they’re done. If you see no sign of raw dough at the center – take ’em out of the oven, they’re perfect.

Brioche buns via @kingarthurflour

Aren’t you craving a burger right about now?

Please read, bake, and review our recipe for Brioche Buns.

Print just the recipe.

The post Brioche Buns appeared first on Flourish - King Arthur Flour.

How to use cupcake and muffin papers

http://blog.kingarthurflour.com/2015/06/26/use-cupcake-muffin-papers/

http://blog.kingarthurflour.com/?p=122109

Cupcake pan liners. Baking cups. Muffin papers.

Whatever words you use for those paper liners that go into a muffin or cupcake pan, I’m sure you’ve heard of them. In fact, you probably have a stash of them in the back of the cupboard right now.

But what you might not know is, how do you know when to use them? And why?

Inquiring bakers want to know!

How to use muffin & cupcake papers via @kingarthurflour

After doing a zillion tests (well, not QUITE that many), I discovered some interesting facts about muffin papers. So let’s jump right in here with some of the burning questions you might have – and yes, “burning” (and its prevention) is one reason you might choose to use muffin papers. Or baking cups. Whatever.

How to use muffin & cupcake papers via @kingarthurflour

Should I use muffin papers when I want to dress up my cupcakes?

Well, the answer’s not exactly black and white.

How to use muffin & cupcake papers via @kingarthurflour

Actually, it IS black and white.

When you’re baking light-colored cupcakes or muffins, definitely use all kinds of fun papers. But when you’re going the dark chocolate route, colorful papers don’t matter that much: as you can see above, the cupcake’s color bleeds through the paper, muddying its design.

If you’re determined to use papers, try doubling them; with two layers, the one on the outside helps keep things bright. Though it also won’t “stick” to the cupcake very well; Hobson’s choice.

Rule of thumb: The darker the cake, the less likely you are to get a pretty result. Unless you use foil cups; more on those later.

How to use muffin & cupcake papers via @kingarthurflour

Do muffin papers make cleanup easier?

Absolutely. When you use papers, you usually don’t even need to wash the pan. Without papers – get out the scrub brush. And as any cupcake or muffin baker knows, scrubbing the 12 wells in a muffin pan, individually, is just as onerous as it sounds.

How to use muffin & cupcake papers via @kingarthurflour

I’ve heard muffin papers can change the shape of your muffins or cupcakes. Is that true?

Well, yes and no – depends on the recipe.

The chocolate cupcakes above – one baked in a paper, one not – are very similar in shape. But the doughnut muffins below them show a definite difference – the one baked without paper peaks rather steeply, rather than forming a nice domed top.

Why’s that? Without the insulation of paper, the sides of the baking muffin set before the center, which continues to rise. With the paper’s insulation, the sides don’t set as quickly – meaning the entire muffin rises, not just its center.

So, how do you know which muffins or cupcakes rise more evenly with the insulation of paper?

You don’t. It’s trial and error – but if you have any doubt, go ahead and use the papers, just in case.

How to use muffin & cupcake papers via @kingarthurflour

Which brings us to another reason to use papers: they keep the muffin or cupcake sides nice and soft, and help prevent potential burning. You can see which muffin was baked in paper, can’t you?

How to use muffin & cupcake papers via @kingarthurflour

If I use muffin papers, should I grease them first?

Well, they do prevent cake from sticking to the paper – sometimes just to a minor degree, as illustrated above (that’s greased paper on the left, ungreased on the right). But sometimes, with more delicate cupcakes, greasing the cups actually prevents chunks of cake sticking to the paper when you peel it off.

So again – better safe than sorry, right? Grease the papers.

How to use muffin & cupcake papers via @kingarthurflour

What about those aluminum foil “papers”? Do they work?

Aluminum papers are attractive in a simple sort of way; and dark cupcakes won’t show through, obviously. But if you expect to use them for stand-alone (no pan) baking – don’t. They tend to flatten out from the pressure of the rising batter.

Bottom line, muffin papers help your muffins and cupcakes in a variety of ways, some subtle, some more apparent…

How to use muffin & cupcake papers via @kingarthurflour

Like this cupcake disaster.

Ever had this happen? Sure you have! I was doing a side-by-side test, papers vs. no papers, in a non-stick pan. Took the cupcakes out of the oven, got the next batch started, then circled back and removed these from the pan 5 minutes after they’d come out of the oven.

Yes, just 5 minutes, but look what happened – the papered cupcakes slipped out easily, but those without papers were absolutely GLUED to the pan.

I had to dig those bottoms out with a spoon, and even then the pan was a mess. I scraped, and scoured, and muttered various unprintable imprecations under my breath… and vowed, from here on in, to ALWAYS use muffin papers.

How to use muffin & cupcake papers via @kingarthurflour

Luckily, I’ve now got all kinds, for every occasion!

Want to play dress-up with your next batch of cupcakes? Check out our selection of papers.

The post How to use cupcake and muffin papers appeared first on Flourish - King Arthur Flour.

Whole Wheat Pie Crust

http://blog.kingarthurflour.com/2015/06/24/whole-wheat-pie-crust/

http://blog.kingarthurflour.com/?p=123387

Flaky, buttery, crispy… whole wheat pie crust?

Doesn’t seem like that’s how to describe a pie crust made with whole wheat, does it? Well folks, put this on your “must bake” list. This crust, made with white whole wheat flour, looks and acts just like its all-purpose cousin – but comes with all of the nutritional benefits that whole wheat brings.

How to make Whole Wheat Pie Crust via @kingarthurflourMaking a pie crust can be a daunting feat for many. It’s the sort of thing that you need to make a few times before it becomes second nature.

I learned to make the perfect pie from the ever-knowledgeable Susan Reid, editor of our new magazine, Sift. She’s pretty masterful, so if you’re starting at square one, it’s well worth reading her pie crust blog. And re-reading it, and printing it to tape on the countertop. Maybe turn it into wallpaper?

Maybe you’re perfectly comfortable making pie, but the thought of introducing whole wheat into the equation is giving you pause. It certainly did me the first time I attempted it. Just breathe, remember that you’re a super-awesome baker who can do anything, and give it a shot!

Traditional whole wheat flour (as opposed to white wheat flour) is going to give you a significantly darker crust; you’ll also to able to taste it. For those who enjoy the taste of whole wheat, this is a benefit. But for those who are trying to add nutrition without anyone being the wiser, white whole wheat is your flour of choice.

How to make Whole Wheat Pie Crust via @kingarthurflour

Same nutritional benefits – totally different taste. How is that possible?

It’s simple. White whole wheat flour is ground from white wheat berries, rather than from red wheat berries, the kind that become traditional whole wheat flour. Both are 100% whole-grain; but the white wheat berries yield flour with a milder taste and lighter color.

Here are a few things to remember when creating a whole-wheat pie crust:

1) Give your whole wheat pie crust a rest before rolling it out.

Your dough will soften up and roll out smoother after the wheat has had a chance to rest. Without that rest, it may tend to crack and split.

I attempted to roll a round of whole-wheat dough immediately after mixing, and it cracked and crumbled. It truly does need at least a 30-minute rest before any rolling and shaping. Once it had a chance to rest, the crust rolled out and crimped up like a dream.

2) Whole wheat flour absorbs more liquid than all-purpose flour.

But that doesn’t necessarily mean you need to add more water to your dough. Treat whole wheat flour the same as all-purpose; it will let you know when it’s had enough. Grab a handful and give it a squeeze. If it sticks together, you’re good.

You can easily add more water; but it’s far harder to adjust dough consistency when there’s too much water. If you try to compensate by working in more flour, the result is often a tough, dry crust.

3) Substituting a little orange juice for water helps with whole wheat pie crust’s flavor.

This trick works well, whether you’re using white whole wheat or traditional whole wheat. OJ tends to temper the wheat’s assertive taste, without adding any orange flavor of its own.

4) Handle the dough for whole wheat pie crust as little as possible.

As with making any pie dough, it’s best to keep handling time to a minimum. Hot hands = melted butter = less flaky. Using a pastry blender will keep the friction down, which will keep your butter cold.

5) For best texture and flavor, use a combination of butter and shortening.

Could you make whole wheat pie crust with all butter? Yes, though your fancy fluted edges might not turn out so well. Shortening gives the pie structure. Butter gives it great flavor. And both fats add to the crust’s flakiness. I think the combination of the two will give you the ideal whole-wheat crust with proper edges.

My fellow blogger PJ Hamel wrote up a fabulous blog comparing the two fats. It explains in far greater detail what using each will produce.

How to make Whole Wheat Pie Crust via @kingarthurflour

Top left: white whole wheat flour; Top right: traditional whole wheat flour; Bottom; all-purpose

I did a little experimenting to see how the process of making an all-purpose, white whole wheat, and whole wheat pie crust compared. Honestly? There isn’t much difference. However, the rest period is more crucial with the whole wheat than the all-purpose.

Concerned that your picky eaters won’t touch a whole-wheat pie, even when stuffed full of sweet fruit? You can see that there’s a huge difference in the appearance of the traditional whole wheat crust versus the one made with all-purpose flour. So maybe that’s not a good start. White whole wheat has a lighter appearance, as well as mellower taste.

Can you make a pie that’s half all-purpose and half whole wheat? Absolutely. Just follow the basic guidelines, adding water a little at a time. The result should be that flaky yet tender crust you’re after.

Fresh Raspberry Pie via @kingarthurflourCreating a whole wheat pie crust is well worth the effort. How else could you justify filling it with chocolate cream and enjoying an extra big slice?! Though personally, I think a Fresh Raspberry Pie should be the first thing on the menu!

Please bake, rate, and review our recipe for Whole Wheat Pie Crust.

Print just the recipe. Don’t forget, you can adjust the font size at the top left of the print page.

The post Whole Wheat Pie Crust appeared first on Flourish - King Arthur Flour.

How to Make Gluten-Free Bread

http://blog.kingarthurflour.com/2015/06/23/how-to-make-gluten-free-bread-bread-machine/

http://blog.kingarthurflour.com/?p=120463

If you’ve ever baked bread in a bread machine, then you know it’s easy-peasy. You just put everything into the loaf pan, choose your settings, hit start, and walk away. It’s like a slow cooker, but for bread.

But the real question is… can you make gluten-free bread in your bread machine?

At first, I was skeptical of using a bread machine for gluten-free dough, because gluten-free bread doesn’t use the same rise times as a traditional recipe. But my fears were quickly put to rest when I realized that the Zojirushi Virtuoso bread machine has a gluten-free setting built right in! How great is that!?

How to make Gluten-Free Bread in a Bread Machine via @kingarthurflour

Knowing that our gluten-free sandwich bread is always a winner (it never fails me), I put it to the test using a Virtuoso. And let me tell you, with just a couple of minor changes, it didn’t disappoint! The bread was absolutely perfect. It was just the right texture, with a nice crust and a soft interior.

And the best part? All I had to do was put everything into the machine and push a button.

So for those of you who’ve been wondering if a) our gluten-free sandwich bread can be made in a bread machine; and/or b) if gluten-free bread turns out just as delicious when made in a bread machine, the answer is a resounding yes!

After baking my bread, I do have some tips for helping to ensure your bread machine yields that ultimate gluten-free loaf you’re hoping for.

How to make Gluten-Free Bread in a Bread Machine via @kingarthurflour

Tip 1: Add a touch more flour.

With our first test of gluten-free sandwich bread in the bread machine using the recipe as written, it lacked the dome that we look for in good sandwich bread. The texture and taste were still there, but the loaf was fairly flat across the top. So we tweaked and tweaked and found that adding just an ounce more gluten-free flour helped us get closer to the dome shape, without compromising the bread’s texture, moistness, or flavor.

 

Tip 2: Add one more egg.

An extra egg helped give the bread a bit more lift. With the addition of the extra flour, we wanted to make sure the bread didn’t dry out, but adding more milk wouldn’t have helped us with structure or rise. So we added one more egg and found results perfect.

 

Tip 3: Let the bread cool completely before slicing.

This is so, so important. When the bread first comes out of the pan it will feel a little soft and under-baked. Have no fear; once you let it cool completely, the crust will harden and the inside will be soft and filled with perfect little air pockets. So good!

And now it’s time to bake! Here’s are some quick step-by-step instructions on how to make gluten-free bread in your bread machine.

How to make Gluten-Free Bread in a Bread Machine via @kingarthurflour

The recipe uses 4 large eggs; one of them sank beneath the milk in this photo.

 

Step 1: Put the liquids into the bread machine followed by the dry ingredients. Follow our recipe, but use 1 additional large egg, and an additional 1 ounce (3 tablespoons) gluten-free flour.

Step 2: Choose your bread machine’s gluten-free setting. Set the crust to medium.

Step 3: Let the machine do its thing.

Step 4: Once the bread is done baking, remove it from the pan and place it back in the machine to finish cooling (this will help keep the crust from getting overly soft and potentially leathery).

Step 5: Slice and enjoy!

OK, now that you’ve baked a loaf, how did it turn out? Do you have any tips for baking gluten-free bread in a bread machine? If so, please let us know in comments, below!

The post How to Make Gluten-Free Bread appeared first on Flourish - King Arthur Flour.

Homemade Pasta

http://blog.kingarthurflour.com/2015/06/21/homemade-pasta-2/

http://blog.kingarthurflour.com/?p=123289

The last time homemade pasta was in vogue, I purchased both a hand-cranked machine, and an extruder attachment for my stand mixer. I played, I rolled, I boiled, and we ate. It was fun, but fairly labor intensive. And between work and family, my pasta-making days were sadly short-lived.

Once again, though, fresh homemade pasta is appearing on the food scene. And thankfully, making and storing your own supply of pasta is easier than ever.

Pull up a chair and join us as we share some basic homemade pasta tips.

PastaFlourC1F

1. Our favorite basic homemade pasta formula

Let’s begin with a basic pasta recipe:

1 large egg per cup of flour used, plus 1 to 2 tablespoons of water as needed.

That’s it, really. Egg, flour, and maybe water.

The flour could be all-purpose, whole wheat, semolina, or a combination of these. Italian-style flour is best if you’re making delicate sheet pasta, like for lasagna. Pastry and cake flours are too soft for homemade pasta.

Some recipes call for added salt, or for adding oil; but they aren’t really necessary for basic pasta dough. You’ll get plenty of saltiness when you cook the pasta in salted water, and the oil is best left as a topping rather than an ingredient.

 

2. Sheets vs. shapes: choose your pasta type

The consistency of the dough will change, depending on the final shape desired. So decide ahead of time what type of pasta you’ll be serving.

PastaSaladC15M

Tubes of some kind – ziti, penne, the macaroni used for this Fresh Macaroni Salad – need a dough that’s fairly dry, in order to pass through an extruder without sticking.

DSC_5798

Make a softer pasta dough, one with added water, for pasta that’ll be rolled into sheets. Once it’s rolled, it can be left whole, to use for lasagna, manicotti, or ravioli; or cut into fettuccine. linguine, or other flat shapes. This Butternut Squash Spinach Lasagna is a good example of pasta that begins life as a softer dough.

 

3. Achieving the best dough consistency

Mix your dough by hand, with a mixer, or in a food processor. The key is to keep an eye on the consistency of the dough more than a clock or timer. When using a mixer, use the dough hook instead of the beater. There’s less surface for the egg to cling to, incorporating it into the flour instead.

Homemade Pasta via @kingarthurflour

Pasta dough for use with extruders – think macaroni, ziti, and other hollow shapes – is a bit different than dough for pasta sheets. It’s drier and doesn’t form a ball as easily. Instead, it looks like pie dough or really lumpy grits. It’ll readily hold together in a clump when squeezed, yet it’s dry enough to cut cleanly.

Homemade Pasta

Pasta dough that’ll be rolled out needs to be softer. It should easily form a ball when squeezed; and just as easily go through the rollers of a pasta machine, yielding soft, smooth, silky sheets of dough, like this spinach pasta for lasagna.

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4. Drying homemade pasta

Once you’ve made your pasta, toss it with some flour to prevent it sticking together. If you’re cooking the pasta right away, it can go directly from the bowl into a pot of boiling water.

If you want to dry your homemade pasta for future use, spread it in a single layer on a large baking sheet. Leave the pasta uncovered in a dry area for 12 to 24 hours, gently stirring and turning it a few times. Flour is fickle, so humidity, temperature, size of the noodles, etc. will all play a part in the total time. A fan can be a big help ensuring your homemade pasta dries quickly and evenly.

When the pasta is completely dry (it should snap when you twist it, not bend), store it airtight at room temperature.

Avoid very humid days for making and drying homemade pasta. If you do decide to make pasta when it’s humid out and drying conditions aren’t optimum, either cook it fresh, or freeze it.

How to Make Pasta via kingarthurflour

5. Freezing homemade pasta

To freeze homemade pasta, place the baking sheet of cut pasta in the freezer for about 15 minutes, or until the individual pieces aren’t sticking to each other or the pan.

Transfer the semi-frozen pasta to airtight bags. Label, date, and place in the freezer for up to 3 months.

Here you see two bags from my freezer. The darker pasta on the left is black pepper pasta made with dough that was a touch too dry. As it sat out and I moved it around to help it dry, the pasta started to break. Again, I’m not going to call it a loss per se. This pasta will go into soup or stew, where it doesn’t play a starring role.

Homemade pasta via @kingarthurflour

6. Don’t overcook your homemade pasta!

Look at these poor noodles! When they crowd the surface of the pot like this, all fat and flabby, they’re probably overcooked.

Homemade pasta cooks much faster than commercially dried pasta. Here’s a little breakdown on approximate times for cooking pasta in boiling, lightly salted water:

Fresh pasta, no drying or freezing: 2 to 3 minutes
Fresh pasta, frozen: 3 to 5 minutes, depending on size
Fresh pasta, air dried: 4 to 7 minutes, depending on size
Commercially dried pasta: 6 to 10 minutes, depending on size

Be sure to have your sauce, toppings, salads, and sides ready at the table  before you drop the pasta into the water. It’ll cook up before you can say “Dinner time!” And cooked pasta waits for no one.

We hope you’ve found these tips helpful. Please share your favorite pasta tips and tricks in our comments below.

For more pasta recipes and tips, check out our additional pasta blog posts.

For the recipe, grab a pen and notecard and jot this down:

1 large egg per cup of flour used, plus 1 to 2 tablespoons of water as needed.

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